Category Archives: partner posts

Raising Seawalls in Japan

by Denis Byrne
Over the last few years on the islands of the Seto Inland Sea, in Japan, new reinforced-concrete seawalls approximately one metre high have been erected on the shoreline in front of old fishing villages and other settlements. Where existing concrete seawalls are in place, these have been heightened by laying a metre of new concrete on top of them.

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Raising Seawalls in Japan

by Denis Byrne
Over the last few years on the islands of the Seto Inland Sea, in Japan, new reinforced-concrete seawalls approximately one metre high have been erected on the shoreline in front of old fishing villages and other settlements. Where existing concrete seawalls are in place, these have been heightened by laying a metre of new concrete on top of them.

On “wastable” urban animals

by Tora Holmberg
What is common between a human ‘dumpster diver’ and a rodent one? What makes an animal – human or non-human – vermin? How does one cross the boundaries between being integrated into urban ecologies, and becoming disposable as waste: potentially wasted or ‘wastable’?

On “wastable” urban animals

by Tora Holmberg
What is common between a human ‘dumpster diver’ and a rodent one? What makes an animal – human or non-human – vermin? How does one cross the boundaries between being integrated into urban ecologies, and becoming disposable as waste: potentially wasted or ‘wastable’?

What was “Hacking the Anthropocene”? (Or, why the Environmental Humanities needs more Feminism)

by Jennifer Mae Hamilton and Astrida Neimanis   Welcome to the Anthropocene! Although this geological era is still to be officially included in the Chronostratigraphic Chart, members of the Anthropocene expert working group agree that we humans are interfering in

What was “Hacking the Anthropocene”? (Or, why the Environmental Humanities needs more Feminism)

by Jennifer Mae Hamilton and Astrida Neimanis   Welcome to the Anthropocene! Although this geological era is still to be officially included in the Chronostratigraphic Chart, members of the Anthropocene expert working group agree that we humans are interfering in